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Blue Skies Looking At Me - Wood Swing with Hand Forged Brackets - 24-in

Blue Skies Looking At Me - Wood Swing with Hand Forged Brackets - 24-in

$ 129.99
This product ships free in the Continental USA with $75+ purchase but requires an oversized shipping surcharge of $10. Please check Oversized Charge box if item is to be shipped. You can avoid this charge by picking up this item in store (select Pickup in Stratford CT Store)

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  • Inspired from the song, this chiseled, mango wood swing is as beautiful as it is functional.
  • Measuring a full 24-in wide and solid wood, this swing includes hand forged metal brackets for attaching swing to rope.
  • Reminiscent of old fashioned, vintage tree swings, this swing seat could serve as a perfect addition to that ancient oak tree in the yard, or hanging from a wide porch ceiling*.
  • Also makes a great decorative piece or a gift to newlyweds or new parents.
  • Some minor assembly of metal bracket hardware to predrilled swing seat required. 
  • Swing rope is not included.
  • Full measurements 24-in x 9-1/2-in x 1-in
  • * IMPORTANT NOTE: This swing seat should be installed for your particular application by a professional to ensure safety and unnecessary injury. Use at your own risk.

Blue Skies was composed in 1926 as a last-minute addition to the Rodgers and Hart musical Betsy. Although the show ran for 39 performances only, "Blue Skies" was an instant success, with audiences on opening night demanding 24 encores of the piece from star Belle Baker. During the final repetition, Ms. Baker forgot her lyrics, prompting Berlin to sing them from his seat in the front row.

In 1927, the music was published and Ben Selvin's recorded version was a hit. That same year, it became one of the first songs to be featured in a talkie, when Al Jolson performed it in The Jazz Singer. The song was recorded for all of the major and dime store labels of the time. Another version of the song was recorded by Benny Goodman and his Orchestra in 1935.

1946 was also a notable year for the song, with a Bing Crosby/Fred Astaire film taking its title along with two recorded versions by Count Basie and Benny Goodman reaching #8 and #9 on the pop charts, respectively. Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye performed the song in 1954's White Christmas.

Crossing genres, Willie Nelson's recording of "Blue Skies" was a #1 country music hit in 1978. It was a major western swing and country standard already in 1939, by Moon Mullican, and in 1962 by Jim Reeves.

Thelonious Monk's 1947 composition "In Walked Bud" is based on the chord changes to "Blue Skies."

"Blue Skies" is one of many popular songs whose lyrics use a "bluebird of happiness" as a symbol of cheer: "Bluebirds singing a song—Nothing but bluebirds all day long."



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